How To Stop Masturbating: Science Meets Spirituality

How To Stop Masturbating: Science Meets Spirituality

Written by dating coach for men Gary Gunn - Founder of Social Attraction

In this article, you will learn how to stop masturbating.

I explore the science and then the spirituality, before giving you eighteen techniques for breaking the habit or reducing its frequency.

The Science of Masturbation

From a science perspective, several processes occur in the male body when the decision to masturbate is made.

Here’s an overview of some of the key biochemical changes:

1. Dopamine release

When a man decides to masturbate, the brain releases dopamine, a neurotransmitter responsible for the feelings of pleasure, reward, and motivation.

  • Dopamine plays a crucial role in sexual arousal and the anticipation of pleasurable experiences.

The release of dopamine can create a positive feedback loop, reinforcing the decision to engage in the act.

2. Activation of the limbic system

The decision to masturbate stimulates the limbic system, a set of interconnected brain structures responsible for regulating emotions, memory, and sexual arousal.

  • Key structures involved include the hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus.

The hypothalamus, in particular, releases hormones and neurotransmitters that contribute to sexual arousal and facilitate the physiological response.

3. Hormonal changes

As arousal builds, the hypothalamus stimulates the production and release of hormones, such as oxytocin and vasopressin.

  • Oxytocin, often called the “love hormone,” contributes to feelings of bonding and intimacy.

Vasopressin has been linked to the regulation of sexual behavior and motivation.

4. Nitric oxide (NO) release

The decision to masturbate and the subsequent arousal lead to the release of nitric oxide (NO) in the blood vessels of the penis.

  • This release of NO causes the blood vessels to dilate.

This increases blood flow to the penis and resulting in an erection.

5. Endorphin release

During sexual arousal and orgasm, the brain releases endorphins, which are natural painkillers and mood elevators.

  • These chemicals can create a sense of euphoria and relaxation, contributing to the pleasurable sensations.

These biochemical processes are interconnected and work together to facilitate sexual arousal, erection, and the experience of pleasure during masturbation.

The Spirituality of Masturbation

There are various spiritual texts and religious teachings that offer guidance on the topic of male masturbation.

Here is a brief overview of the perspectives found in some of the major spiritual traditions:

Hinduism

In Hinduism, sexual energy is considered divine and powerful, as it is believed to be a representation of the creative force of the universe.

  • The Kama Sutra, an ancient Hindu text, offers guidance on sexual pleasure, including masturbation.

However, some Hindu texts, such as the Bhagavad Gita, emphasize the importance of self-control and moderation, which can be interpreted as discouraging excessive indulgence in sexual activities, including masturbation.

Buddhism

Buddhism teaches the Middle Way, a path of moderation that avoids extremes.

  • Sexual desire is considered a form of attachment, which can lead to suffering.

Masturbation is not explicitly mentioned in the Buddhist scriptures, but it can be seen as a form of indulgence in sensual pleasure, which may hinder one’s spiritual progress.

Taoism

Taoist teachings emphasize harmony and balance in all aspects of life, including sexuality.

  • Some Taoist practices, such as sexual qigong, involve the cultivation and conservation of sexual energy.

In this context, excessive masturbation may be seen as depleting one’s vital energy (qi), but moderate masturbation could be considered part of a balanced sexual life.

Breaking The Habit of Masturbation

Breaking the habit of masturbation can be challenging, but there are various strategies that can help.

Here are some suggestions:

  • Understand your triggers

Pay attention to the situations, feelings, or environments that often lead to the desire to masturbate.

Identifying these triggers can help you avoid or manage them more effectively.

  • Set clear goals

Establish a specific goal for yourself, such as reducing the frequency of masturbation or abstaining completely.

Having a clear objective can help you stay focused and motivated.

  • Create a daily routine

A structured daily routine can help minimize idle time and boredom, which can contribute to the urge to masturbate.

Fill your day with productive activities, such as work, exercise, hobbies, or socializing with friends and family.

  • Practice self-discipline

Strengthening your self-control can help you resist the urge to masturbate.

Develop your discipline by setting small, achievable goals in other areas of your life and gradually building on your successes.

  • Engage in physical activity

Regular exercise can help reduce stress, boost your mood, and provide a healthy outlet for your energy.

Physical activities, such as jogging, swimming, or yoga, can help you focus on your body in a positive way.

  • Find alternative coping mechanisms

If you use masturbation as a way to cope with stress, anxiety, or other negative emotions, try to find healthier alternatives.

Meditation, deep breathing exercises, or talking to a friend or therapist can help you deal with these feelings more effectively.

  • Limit exposure to sexual stimuli

Avoid consuming explicit material, such as pornography, and be mindful of your online activities.

Limiting exposure to sexual content can help reduce the frequency of urges to masturbate.

  • Develop a support network

Share your goals with trusted friends or family members who can offer encouragement, advice, and accountability.

Alternatively, you can join a support group or online forum where others are dealing with similar challenges.

  • Focus on your mental health

Address any underlying mental health issues, such as depression or anxiety, which may contribute to the habit of masturbation.

Seeking professional help from a therapist or counselor can be beneficial.

  • Be patient and persistent

Breaking a habit can be difficult and may require time and effort.

Expect setbacks and be prepared to forgive yourself and continue working towards your goals.

Further Ways of Breaking The Habit of Masturbation

Here are some unusual or unconventional methods that may help in reducing or stopping the habit of masturbation:

  • Aversion therapy

Associate the act of masturbation with an unpleasant sensation, such as snapping a rubber band on your wrist, to create a negative association.

Over time, this might reduce the urge to masturbate.

  • Wear gloves

Wearing gloves while sleeping or during times when you might be tempted to masturbate.

You can create a physical barrier and make it more difficult to engage in the act.

  • Change your environment

Rearrange your room, particularly the area where you typically masturbate.

This change can disrupt the habit loop and make it less likely for you to engage in the behavior.

  • Use a mantra

Repeat a phrase or mantra to yourself when you feel the urge to masturbate.

This could be something like, “I am in control of my desires,” or any other phrase that helps you refocus your attention.

  • Visualization

Imagine yourself successfully resisting the urge to masturbate and feeling proud of your self-control.

Visualization can help reinforce your commitment to breaking the habit.

  • Engage in creative pursuits

Channel your energy into artistic or creative activities, such as painting, writing, or playing music.

Use these as a way to redirect your focus and reduce the urge to masturbate.

  • Try exposure therapy

Gradually expose yourself to the triggers that usually lead to the desire to masturbate, but resist the urge to engage in the act.

This can help desensitize you to these triggers over time.

  • Use a physical reminder

Wear a bracelet, ring, or other piece of jewelry as a physical reminder of your commitment to stop masturbating.

When you see or touch this item, it can help reinforce your resolve.

Conclusion

  • Masturbation involves dopamine release, activation of the limbic system, and hormonal changes.
  • Major spiritual traditions emphasize moderation, self-control, and the cultivation of sexual energy.
  • Simple strategies can help individuals reduce or stop the habit of masturbation.

Transform Your Dating Results With My Mentoring & Digital Products


If you are serious about improving your dating results then I invite you to visit the links below.

Together, we’ll refine your skills, tackle any sticking points, and ensure that you’re well on your way to getting the success you desire.

Don’t leave your dating life to chance. Click the links below and let’s transform your results.

Resources

  1. Please note that the effectiveness of these methods may vary from person to person, and there is limited scientific evidence supporting their efficacy. As with any behavior change, it is essential to approach this process with patience and persistence, as well as an understanding of your own unique needs and circumstances.While it is challenging to find research studies that directly address the unusual methods to stop masturbation mentioned earlier, some of the techniques are derived from broader principles of habit change and psychological interventions. Here are some studies and resources related to these principles:
  2. McRobbie, H., & Hajek, P. (2001). Using aversive smoking in the treatment of tobacco dependence. CNS Drugs, 15(5), 353-363. Aversion therapy has been used in the treatment of various unwanted behaviors, such as smoking and alcohol dependence. A study by McRobbie, H., & Hajek, P. (2001) discusses the application of aversive stimuli in smoking cessation.
  3. Neal, D. T., Wood, W., & Quinn, J. M. (2006) highlights the role of environmental cues in habit formation and suggests that changing the environment can disrupt habitual behaviors. Source: Neal, D. T., Wood, W., & Quinn, J. M. (2006). Habits—A repeat performance. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 15(4), 198-202
  4. Holmes, P. S., & Collins, D. J. (2001). The PETTLEP approach to motor imagery: A functional equivalence model for sport psychologists. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 13(1), 60-83.Visualization has been found to be effective in various contexts, including sports performance and behavior change. A study by Holmes, P. S., & Collins, D. J. (2001) discusses the effectiveness of mental imagery in enhancing performance and changing behaviors.
  5. Craske, M. G., & Mystkowski, J. L. (2006). Exposure therapy and extinction: Clinical studies. In M. G. Craske, D. Hermans, & D. Vansteenwegen (Eds.), Fear and learning: From basic processes to clinical implications (pp. 217-233). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Exposure therapy is a well-established psychological intervention for reducing anxiety and fear associated with specific triggers. A study by Craske, M. G., & Mystkowski, J. L. (2006) reviews the principles of exposure therapy and its applications in various contexts.
  6. Baumeister, R. F., & Heatherton, T. F. (1996). Self-regulation failure: An overview. Psychological Inquiry, 7(1), 1-15. Triggers and self-awareness: A study on self-regulation by Baumeister, R. F., & Heatherton, T. F. (1996) suggests that understanding one’s triggers and developing self-awareness can be crucial for habit change.
  7. Locke, E. A., & Latham, G. P. (2002). Building a practically useful theory of goal setting and task motivation: A 35-year odyssey. American Psychologist, 57(9), 705-717. Research by Locke, E. A., & Latham, G. P. (2002) has demonstrated the importance of setting specific and challenging goals for behavior change.
  8. Salmon, P. (2001). Effects of physical exercise on anxiety, depression, and sensitivity to stress: A unifying theory. Clinical Psychology Review, 21(1), 33-61. Physical activity and mental health: Numerous studies have shown the positive effects of physical activity on mental health, including stress reduction. For example, a study by Salmon, P. (2001) discusses the benefits of exercise for managing stress and anxiety.
  9. Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003). Mindfulness-based interventions in context: Past, present, and future. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10(2), 144-156. Mindfulness and meditation: Research by Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003) and others has shown that mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques, such as meditation, can help with various mental health issues and habit change.
  10. DiClemente, C. C., & Prochaska, J. O. (1998). Toward a comprehensive, transtheoretical model of change: Stages of change and addictive behaviors. In W. R. Miller & N. Heather (Eds.), Treating addictive behaviors (2nd ed., pp. 3-24). New York, NY: Plenum Press. Social support and behavior change: A study by DiClemente, C. C., & Prochaska, J. O. (1998) highlights the importance of social support in the process of behavior change.

Written by Gary Gunn


Gary Gunn is a trained coach, accredited therapist and best selling author. He offers proven, evidence-based dating advice for single men.

He has hosted over 1,000 in-person dating confidence courses across the UK and Europe, as well as over 1,500 online courses.

As the head coach at Social Attraction, he leads the team and oversees the training and courses provided, helping countless men transform their dating lives.
Dating Coach